Family Support

At The Manor Clinic, we understand that the pain of substance misuse, addiction, and co-occurring mental health disorders can extend far beyond the afflicted individual. These issues can impact the lives of family members, close friends, professional colleagues, and others who care about or depend upon the individual who has been struggling with addiction.

We also realise that these individuals can play an essential role in the recovery process. For these reasons, we are proud to offer a vibrant Family Support that is designed to address individual needs, strengthen the family unit, and educate family members on how best to support their family member’s continued recovery.

In a safe, non-judgemental environment, our Family Liaison Team offers support and information to help family members, friends and colleagues of those who have misused substances to understand the disease of addiction, set and maintain healthy boundaries and develop more constructive ways to communicate.

Among the features of our family support programme is the opportunity to participate in fortnightly family therapy sessions. Led by an experienced member of our Family Liaison Team, family therapy sessions are excellent opportunities for the person in treatment and their family member to address the ways that addiction has impacted them as individuals and as a family.

Family therapy also provides a structured and supportive environment in which family members can address the pain that they have experienced in a healthy and productive manner, and can learn how to make the lifestyle changes that will empower them to live healthier and more satisfying lives while also providing the most effective support to their family member as he or she walks the path of lifelong addiction recovery.

For more information about Family Support at The Manor Clinic, or for answers to any other questions that you may have about any aspect of treatment, please feel free to contact us at your convenience. We look forward to providing you with the information that you need to make the right decisions for yourself or for a family member.

Family intervention

Our family support programme is designed to address individual needs, strengthen the family unit, and educate family members on how best to support their family member’s continued recovery. One part of this is teaching family, friends and colleagues about intervention.

If you think there is somebody in your family with an alcohol or drug problem, you probably feel very anxious about it or very helpless – it’s quite terrifying when you begin to see that someone you love – a husband, a wife or a child, is using too much and causing harm to their self or others. A lot of the fear comes from not understanding the problem enough – the main thing to know is – addictions can be and are treated successfully.

Other important things to be aware of, in order to make an intervention are:

  • Knowing the signs and symptoms of an addiction – recognise changes in behaviour, appearance, loss of interest, ethical deterioration, secrecy, denial
  • Knowing how to react – family and friends will often feel fearful, hopeless, guilty, isolated and embarrassed. Our family liaison team can support you during this painful time and remember – this is not your fault and you shouldn’t be resigned to emotional blackmail
  • Knowing where to turn – you cannot control an addict nor force them to the doctor or local support group for example. Many families try for years to persuade their loved one to get help and the addict’s response is usually ‘there is nothing wrong with me!’
  • How to help yourself as well as the person with the addiction – what is good for you is good for the addict
  • How to break the denial syndrome – it is very unusual for the addict to seek help unless there is no other alternative. Addicts are usually unable to recognise that they need help and this is called denial. ‘My using is not that bad’, even though others see that it is a disaster. The solution is to use a crisis which the addict creates so that the addict has no alternative but to seek help
  • How to let your loved one know how you feel – show tough love without shouting. Tell them clearly and directly when they are reasonably sober/clean if you are upset, hurt angry or afraid
  • How to help yourself as well as the person with the addiction – what is good for you is good for the addict
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